Hemorrhagic Stroke (Bleeds)

What is Hemorrhagic Stroke?

Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for about 13 percent of stroke cases.

It results from a weakened vessel that ruptures and bleeds into the surrounding brain. The blood accumulates and compresses the surrounding brain tissue. The two types of hemorrhagic strokes are intracerebral (within the brain) hemorrhage or subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Hemorrhagic stroke occurs when a weakened blood vessel ruptures. Two types of weakened blood vessels usually cause hemorrhagic stroke: aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs).

Image of a human brain

What is an Arteriovenous Malformation

An arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a cluster of abnormally formed blood vessels. Any one of these vessels can rupture, also causing bleeding into the brain.

What You Should Know about Cerebral Aneurysms

An aneurysm is a ballooning of a weakened region of a blood vessel. If left untreated, the aneurysm continues to weaken until it ruptures and bleeds into the brain.

Spot a stroke F.A.S.T.

Use the letters in "F.A.S.T." to spot signs of a stroke and know when to call 9-1-1.

By learning and sharing the F.A.S.T. warning signs, you just might save a life from stroke.